Come and See: But Don’t just take MY word for it! See For Yourself

Come and See: Observing something yourself can be the most powerful testimony there is. After all, when you are an eyewitness, you can draw your own conclusions. As we discussed yesterday, it was the advice Jesus gave to John’s disciples, who were checking Jesus out based on John’s recommendation. It’s easy to be skeptical of sales pitches and belief systems, but we are more readily swayed by evidence. (Except for magic shows, seeing is believing, right?)

Backwater Towns Never Make History

Philip, like Andrew and Peter, was from the town of Bethsaida (located on the NE shore of the Sea of Galilee). Undoubtedly Philip was familiar with the two brothers; perhaps he fished with them or knew them because they grew up together in a small town. After Philip was introduced to Jesus, he went to tell one of his good friends about it: “Philip found Nathanael and told him, “We have found the one Moses wrote about in the Law, and about whom the prophets also wrote—Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph.” “Nazareth! Can anything good come from there?” Nathanael asked. “Come and see,” said Philip. (John 1:44-46 NIV)

Nazareth was the backwoods part of Galilee, not really noteworthy of anything and certainly not part of the prophetic story that heralded the Messiah. (Part of why not only Nathanael but the Pharisees disregarded Jesus in John 7:52, since their “superior” grasp of scripture enabled them to know that Galilee was not mentioned as the Messiah’s place of origin…)  By assuming they already knew all the answers, the Pharisees looked condescendingly on others and on current events. They were locked into a religious bigotry that excluded others.

Most of the Pharisees never got over their prejudice, and continued to see Jesus as a rube from the country whose credentials were suspect; Nathanael at least went and met Jesus himself to find out what Philip was talking about. Philip’s eyewitness testimony was simple, and very similar to what Jesus said to John’s disciples: “Come and see”. It’s also what Thomas did when he had doubts…

come and see

Quick Knowledge Test

Two things stand out about this. One, don’t be so sure you know something that you miss the truth. John Wooden said, “It’s what you learn after you know it all that counts.” Go to the source, oh readers of questionable social media and network news! You’ll be surprised how often something is misrepresented in second-hand accounts, or distorted by your presuppositions and assumptions. If you think you know Jesus of Nazareth based on what others (like me) have said about him, then you probably don’t. Quick: What were his three best parables? What three conversations did he have that broke all barriers down and revolutionized religion? What would you say are the top three commandments he laid down? If you don’t know what HE said about these things, you probably don’t. Know. Him.  Come; see for yourself.

Second, Philip described Jesus as “the one Moses wrote about in the Law, and about whom the prophets also wrote”. Philip knew the Scriptures, and he connected the dots. He had looked into the Scriptures to see EVIDENCE of prophecy and the references about who the Messiah would be. Even when Nathanael objected, Philip encouraged him to come and see for himself. He saw something in Jesus that prompted him to tell his friends about him, and to persist over their objections. Whom do you know that would benefit from an introduction to the man from Galilee? Help them connect the dots this year. Invite them to come and see. And by the way, I’m inviting you.

Come For Yourself; See For Yourself

Everyone is skeptical when salesmen try to sell,
Pushing just a little as they try to weave a spell;
They will overcome objections, use a trial close,
Until we finally tell them, “NO. I don’t want one of those.”
It can be the same with Jesus: people try to tell us,
But we already “know” the things we think they’re trying to sell us;
So here’s the deal: Go take your Bible down from off that shelf,
And Read the book of John. Go spend some time with him yourself.
Walk down a dusty Galilean road with him awhile;
Read a parable or two, and try to see his smile.
See him bless the children as they played around his knees,
Listen to his words as he confronts the Pharisees:
If you don’t like the stuff he taught, then you can disregard him;
Just please don’t let a bad sales pitch allow you to discard him!
Instead of preachers, books, or movies, or even guys like me:
I challenge you to read it for yourself, to Come and See.

To buy my latest book, Real People, Real Christmas: Thirty-one Days Discovering the Hidden Treasures of the Christmas Story, go here: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1729034918/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
For Slaying Giants: Thirty Days with David, go here: https://www.amazon.com/Slaying-Giants-Thirty-Devotions-Ordinary/dp/172568327X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1535814431&sr=8-1&keywords=Slaying+Giants%3A+Thirty+Days+With+David
To buy my book, Beggar’s Bread, go here: https://www.amazon.com/Beggars-Bread-Devotions-Ordinary-Guy/dp/1535457392/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1473336800&sr=8-1&keywords=Beggar%27s+Bread

Seeing is believing. Sometimes, Though, NOT Seeing is Also Believing…

They say “seeing is believing”. Is it also possible that “NOT seeing is also believing”? Consider this account of the healing Capernaum official’s son…

A Long-Distance Sign

“And there was a certain royal official whose son lay sick at Capernaum. When this man heard that Jesus had arrived in Galilee from Judea, he went to him and begged him to come and heal his son, who was close to death. “Unless you people see signs and wonders,” Jesus told him, “you will never believe.” The royal official said, “Sir, come down before my child dies.” “Go,” Jesus replied, “your son will live.” The man took Jesus at his word and departed. This is again the second miracle that Jesus did, when he was come out of Judaea into Galilee.” (John 4:47-50, 54 NIV, KJV)

seeing

I’ve always thought that Jesus’ conversations with Nicodemus and the woman at the well really showed the dramatic impact he had on other peoples’ lives. They illustrate how the Messiah talked with folks from very different walks of life in very different settings. Those conversations had a high degree of engagement. They resulted in changed lives. And certainly a man of God who healed, who fed thousands, and who walked on water deserved their full attention. Jesus was after all a famous Rabbi who had a following and a reputation.

The Paparazzi Had Not Yet Arrived…

But consider this: this miracle in John 4:47 is the SECOND miracle Jesus performed, after turning water into good wine at the wedding in Cana. When Jesus talked to Nicodemus and the woman at the well, there would not yet have been any buzz started among the paparazzi. No adoring, curious, or hungry crowds had started following him around at this time. Nicodemus and the woman spoke with him without seeing or hearing about any of the miracles we are all familiar with.

The wedding at Cana had probably started a couple of rumors, but it was a private affair in a small, remote town. As Jesus told Mary, “My hour has not yet come.” He had barely started his public ministry, and “water into wine at a wedding” was not yet much of a resume. He had probably made a good impression at the feast in Jerusalem, but these conversations with Nicodemus and the Samaritan woman took place BEFORE this second miracle, early in his ministry. The fact that Nicodemus sought Jesus out indicates that people were starting to notice this surprising young Rabbi, but if you put this event on a timeline, it happened very early in Jesus’ ministry.

So, What Does It Take to Believe?

Perhaps lost in the shuffle is that, with these two significant conversations, Jesus did not yet have a crazy reputation or mad street cred—just himself and the truth. Nicodemus and the Samaritan woman saw no signs or wonders, they just heard Jesus’ words and believed. Hmm… Imagine not seeing any of Jesus’ miracles and depending solely upon his words and the truth. Nicodemus and the woman at the well were able to simply hear about him, hear what he said and accept him. (Wow! Does that seem revolutionary to you? It’s actually a lot like us, based on the same type of opportunity everyone in the world has…)

If you had a conversation with Jesus today, what do you think would he say to you? If you are a doubter, maybe something along the lines of what he said to Thomas in the upper room: “Thomas, because you have seen Me, you have believed. Blessed are those who have not seen and yet have believed.” (John 20:29) Like Thomas, you too can be blessed whether you’ve seen miracles or not. Listen. Believe.

Not Seeing Is Believing

It’s hard to imagine who Jesus was,
Before the attention, the crowds, the buzz–
A carpenter from a backwater town
Where no one followed him around,
Or said ‘Hosanna!’, or made a fuss:
“It’s Joseph’s son! He’s just like us!”
As he walked around, do you think they knew?
Did folks in the town even have a clue?
You could certainly tell he was no fool
When he taught the kids in Sunday School.
I’m sure they thought he was kind and wise,
And yes, there was something about those eyes…
But before any miracles were received,
There were some who listened, and then believed.
In a way they’re just like you and me,
With faith in what they did not see,
Believing in promises yet to be,
And the quiet man from Galilee…

To purchase my newest book Real People, Real Christmas: Thirty-one Days Discovering the Hidden Treasures of the Christmas Story, go here: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1729034918/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
For Slaying Giants: Thirty Days with David, go here: https://www.amazon.com/Slaying-Giants-Thirty-Devotions-Ordinary/dp/172568327X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1535814431&sr=8-1&keywords=Slaying+Giants%3A+Thirty+Days+With+David
To buy my book, Beggar’s Bread, go here: https://www.amazon.com/Beggars-Bread-Devotions-Ordinary-Guy/dp/1535457392/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1473336800&sr=8-1&keywords=Beggar%27s+Bread