Real Leaders Have to Be Willing to Let Leaders Lead

The Bible contains some pretty good advice for leaders. “Moses’ father-in-law said to him, “The thing that you are doing is not good. You will surely wear out, both yourself and these people who are with you, for the task is too heavy for you; you cannot do it alone. Now listen to me: I will give you counsel, and God be with you. You be the people’s representative before God, and you bring the disputes to God, then teach them the statutes and the laws, and make known to them the way in which they are to walk and the work they are to do. Furthermore, you shall select out of all the people able men who fear God, men of truth, those who hate dishonest gain; and you shall place these over them as leaders of thousands, of hundreds, of fifties and of tens. Let them judge the people at all times; and let it be that every major dispute they will bring to you, but every minor dispute they themselves will judge. So it will be easier for you, and they will bear the burden with you.” (Exodus 18:17-22 NASB)

Moses’ father-in-law is introduced in Exodus 2:18 as Reuel, which means “friend of God”. He was a Midianite priest who was also called Jethro, which was probably a title of respect, meaning “excellency.” He was a devout man who celebrated Moses’ return from Egypt with burnt offerings, and said in Exodus 18:11, “Now I know that the Lord is greater than all other gods, for he did this to those who had treated Israel arrogantly.” It must have been a bit of a surprise to him that Moses left as one of his shepherds and came back as the ruler of thousands and thousands of Israelites, but as he observed his son-in-law try to manage things, Jethro could see that Moses needed some help. He greeted Moses with enthusiasm and then offered him this wise counsel in verses 17-22.

The Bible is full of good, practical advice about leadership, and it offers many examples of good management technique. In this case, Moses was doing what many bosses assume: “if you want something done right, you have to do it yourself”. As a result, Moses was wearing himself out as the sole judge and arbiter for all of the Israelites, conducting daily hearings to help settle disputes among all of the people.

Jethro, his father-in-law, counseled him to 1) educate the people about God’s statutes and laws; 2) select godly leaders who loved the truth, and 3) lighten his workload by sharing the burden of leadership. If you have a leadership position, if God has given you a task, then think like Jethro and act like Moses. Surround yourself with honest, godly people who will exercise their own gifts and abilities to share the burden and lighten the load. Just make sure you look for the right qualifications. Jethro

said, “…select out of all the people able men who fear God, men of truth, those who hate dishonest gain.” That’s actually a pretty strong list, and if you applied those qualifications to a business, or a church, or to, say, Congress, how many leaders would ACTUALLY be left to lead? I think Moses’ problem today would be in finding enough able men who fear God, love truth, and hate dishonest gain. But asking if others have those qualifications as leaders is really the SECOND question. The first question is, would YOU qualify? If you lead anyone, anywhere—if you are a mom, a dad, a boss, a teacher, a friend, whatever—those are the qualities you should pray for, and hope you see not just in others but also when you look in the mirror.

Jethro watched the way that Moses managed
And felt that he was somewhat disadvantaged.
He said, My son, Don’t try to do it all,
You’ll soon discover you will hit the wall,
And jeopardize your mission and your health:
Instead of doing all the work yourself,
Select some honest, godly men to lead
And it will give you all the help you need.”
Moses followed Jethro’s plan to lead,
And found a better platform to succeed.
If working hard’s not getting us what we need,
Perhaps that’s something all of us should heed.
Choose on godliness, if you can see it;
And best, for godly leadership, just be it.

To buy my latest book, Slaying Giants: Thirty Days with David, go here: https://www.amazon.com/Slaying-Giants-Thirty-Devotions-Ordinary/dp/172568327X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1535814431&sr=8-1&keywords=Slaying+Giants%3A+Thirty+Days+With+David

To buy my book, Beggar’s Bread, go here: https://www.amazon.com/Beggars-Bread-Devotions-Ordinary-Guy/dp/1535457392/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1473336800&sr=8-1&keywords=Beggar%27s+Bread
For the Kindle Edition, go here: https://www.amazon.com/Beggars-Bread-Bo-Jackson-ebook/dp/B01K5Z0NLA/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1473336800&sr=8-2&keywords=Beggar%27s+Bread

 

Leadership, God’s Way: Put the Wrong Kind of Leadership in the Wrong Place at the Wrong Time

There are lots of books and blogs about leadership; apparently God hasn’t read any of them. Instead of dominating His way into men’s affairs, He chose to place Jesus into His Kingdom like this: “Who, being in very nature God, did not consider equality with God something to be used to his own advantage; rather, he made himself nothing by taking the very nature of a servant, being made in human likeness…” (Philippians 2:6-7 NIV) As you consider what Paul is saying about leadership, here are a couple of observations about these verses: First, Jesus left his position in the heavenly realm and became a man.

Take a moment and just try to imagine the gap between where he was and where we are. He came from the right hand of God the Father, a position of heavenly power and glory. He left all that to come to earth. Hw did not arrive here as the reigning monarch, but he allowed himself to be placed into the tiny form of a helpless baby. He traded the omniscience of deity for the vulnerability of manhood. He left the security of his kingdom to go behind enemy lines, wagering everything in history on not his Father’s might, but His Father’s love…

He took no unfair advantage over the powers of this world, and yet he challenged them utterly with nothing but his Word and his life. He was very God of very God, and yet he demanded no riches, no opulence, no glory… Compare that with Roman Emperors, who used every advantage, leveraged every bit of power they could grasp, and even claimed to be gods! Jesus, refusing the trappings of the world, came to a common family, far away from palaces and politics. As “Jesus Christ Superstar” once pointed out, he came to earth before the printing press, mass communications, and even before social media. Quick: how many Rabbis do you remember from the first century? How many Roman Emperors? Rulers of Persia, Egypt, China? How many people who were crucified by the Roman government?

The Roman Empire is long gone, yet Jesus established a kingdom on earth that people everywhere still recognize, and his story had been told throughout history, throughout the world. His organization did not follow any earthly blueprint for success: he didn’t go to the best schools or have earthly wealth; his recruits were fishermen, tradesmen, students, and even a traitor; he came as a servant and always gave glory to someone else; he was vulnerable, honest and forthright; and he was killed at a young age by men who wielded earthly  power. Yet in spite of all of those things, his kingdom thrives today, twenty-one centuries later…

Which leads to observation #2: His leadership was totally counter-cultural. Even though he was GOD, He humbled himself. He didn’t leverage deity to try to be important, as Caesar did; he came as a servant and served. The contrast between the way Jesus led and the way our leaders do is still dramatic. How many of our Congressmen and Presidents these days are wealthy? How many of them ACTUALLY serve anyone? Mark 10:45 says, “For even the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life a ransom for many.” Maybe our criteria for leadership is a bit flawed… If we only selected leaders with humility who are willing to serve, I bet the world would be a better place. I bet it would look a lot more like the place that Jesus left in order to come here.

Leaders lust for power, fortune, fame, and for renown;
God took earthly leadership and turned it upside down.
Earthly leaders like to strut, but God threw them a curve,
And sent a spiritual king whose only mission was to serve.
What if leaders acted like they all were heaven-sent?
Would it change the Congress, or the current president?
Jesus was a servant. You just think of that, because
I wonder how our world would be if EVERY leader was?
For Jesus that's only way a leader is defined;
Sadly, servant leadership is pretty hard to find;
(It's not the way our leaders or our culture is inclined)
But if you're called to leadership, then please keep that in mind.

To buy my book, Beggar’s Bread, go here: https://www.amazon.com/Beggars-Bread-Devotions-Ordinary-Guy/dp/1535457392/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1473336800&sr=8-1&keywords=Beggar%27s+Bread
For the Kindle Edition, go here: https://www.amazon.com/Beggars-Bread-Bo-Jackson-ebook/dp/B01K5Z0NLA/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1473336800&sr=8-2&keywords=Beggar%27s+Bread

Standing Leadership on Its Head: The Man Who Led the Wrong Way

There are lots of different definitions of leadership, and many ways to lead. Wikipedia says, “Controversial viewpoints are present in the literature, among Eastern and Western approaches to leadership, and also within the West, on US vs. European approaches.”  I’m sure these approaches have their strong and weak points, but here’s a rarely-used one that’s worth considering. It’s also one that’s worth following.

“Jesus called them together and said, “You know that those who are regarded as rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them, and their high officials exercise authority over them. Not so with you. Instead, whoever wants to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wants to be first must be slave of all. For even the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.” (Mark 10:42-45, NIV)

James and John had approached Jesus and asked to sit next to him when he came into glory. This caused some friction among the other disciples, who resented the idea and wanted to establish their own place in the pecking order. Jesus starts by reminding them how the Gentile leaders operated, and told them to turn that model upside down. This paradigm for leadership was not just something Jesus talked about, it was something he lived and demonstrated.

When some of John’s disciples asked him what he was about, his answer was “Come, and you will see.” (John 1:30) His direct, accessible leadership style was founded upon exemplary humility and service. Quick, make a list of all the leaders you have ever known who operated the same way. I bet it’s a short list. Our cultural definition of leadership requires authority, giftedness, the ability to motivate people, strength, and ego. In today’s political world it also takes a large amount of money. Jesus says that instead of lording it over others, the leader should be a servant and a slave to all. So stop and recalibrate your definition of leadership. Think of ways you can serve others. Then get out there and lead!

 

Politicians interest me. It seems that no one dares
To ask why all those Congressmen end up as millionaires...
Aren't they public servants? That's a term that I've heard used,
But more and more it seems like public trust has been abused.
Leaders strut and posture, and they'll offer up a speech,
But more and more it seems that they are rich and out of reach.
Jesus told his followers, "Don't do what rulers do:
They exercise authority and lord it over you.
Instead, if you desire to lead, and want to be the best,
Don't emulate those leaders who are just like all the rest,
But here's a thought on leadership that you should contemplate:
Go serve, and be a slave to all. Then you'll be truly great."
The disciples looked around the room; they knew it must be true.
For after all, it's what they'd always seen the Master do.

 

To buy my book, Beggar’s Bread, go here: https://www.amazon.com/Beggars-Bread-Devotions-Ordinary-Guy/dp/1535457392/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1473336800&sr=8-1&keywords=Beggar%27s+Bread
For the Kindle Edition, go here: https://www.amazon.com/Beggars-Bread-Bo-Jackson-ebook/dp/B01K5Z0NLA/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1473336800&sr=8-2&keywords=Beggar%27s+Bread